YVONNE KOOLMATRIE

YVONNE KOOLMATRIE: THE APPROACH

Weaving is vital to Ngarrindjeri culture, it sustains us.

At a workshop in the early 1980s with Aunty Dorothy Kartinyeri, I was introduced to the traditional methods of weaving sedge rushes (Lepidosperma canescens). This type of sedge grows along the Coorong and Murray River  in Ngarrindjeri country and so weaving is linked to the river and its health – when the  river suffers, the sedge grass is harder to find; when it flourishes, so do the rushes. The river, the Coorong, the sea and the lake are the four waters of the Ngarrindjeri and are all connected. Weaving is vital to Ngarrindjeri culture, it sustains us.

Back to Exhibition Page

 

Eel trap

Eel traps

  Sister basket  
  Coorong Dreaming



YVONNE KOOLMATRIE
Eel traps, 2008
installation view, Anne & Gordon Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide, 2009
woven sedge
dimensions 235 x 44 x 8 cm and 152 x 39 x 8 cm
Courtesy of the University of South Australia Art Collection, Adelaide
photography: Sam Noonan
Courtesy of the artist and Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney
YVONNE KOOLMATRIE
Eel traps, 2008
installation view, Anne & Gordon Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide, 2009
woven sedge
dimensions 235 x 44 x 8 cm and 152 x 39 x 8 cm
Courtesy of the University of South Australia Art Collection, Adelaide
photography: Sam Noonan
Courtesy of the artist and Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney
YVONNE KOOLMATRIE
Sister basket, 2007
coil-woven sedge grass and river rushes
dimensions 62 x 33 x 13 cm
Purchased 2007
Queensland Art Gallery Foundation Grant, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane
Courtesy of the artist and Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney
YVONNE KOOLMATRIE
Coorong Dreaming, 1995
sedge grass
dimensions 117.5 x 125 x 1 cm
Purchased 1999
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Courtesy of the artist and Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Sydney

 

Back to Exhibition Page

 

cover1

  SignupENews