RICHARD BELL  

RICHARD BELL: THE APPROACH 


We will not be put in darkies corner.      

The incursion in the vestibule of the Art Gallery of South Australia has been inspired by one of the most iconic images of the twentieth century  – an image that depicts the medal winners on the victory dais following the result of the men’s 200-metre sprint at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

The gold and bronze medallists were the Americans Tommie Smith and John Carlos respectively. The silver medallist was an Australian, Peter Norman. The three were to become lifelong friends.

The story preceding and following the ceremony is extraordinary.  It begins with talk of an Olympic boycott by black American athletes in support of the American Civil Rights Movement. Smith and Carlos were expected to finish first and second, but Norman snatched the silver from Carlos a stride or two from the finish.  After the race, Smith and Carlos asked Norman’s permission to perform their protest.

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Old Aboriginal Sayings (Bell's Theorem) 2011

One Day You'll All be Gone (Bell's Theorem) 2011

Peace heals, war kills (Big ass mutha fuckin’ mural), 2011 

RICHARD BELL
Old Aboriginal saying (Bell’s Theorem), 2011
acrylic on canvas
2 parts, 240 x 360 cm overall
Image courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane
RICHARD BELL
One day you’ll all be gone (Bell’s Theorem), 2011
acrylic on canvas
3 parts, 244 x 550 cm overall
Image courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane
RICHARD BELL IN COLLABORATION WITH EMORY DOUGLAS
Peace heals, war kills (Big ass mutha fuckin’ mural), 2011
mural, acrylic on wood
installation view, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney 2011
Image courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane

 

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